/*********************************************** * Chrome CSS Drop Down Menu- (c) Dynamic Drive DHTML code library (www.dynamicdrive.com) * This notice MUST stay intact for legal use * Visit Dynamic Drive at http://www.dynamicdrive.com/ for full source code ***********************************************/
History
Minnesota National Guard
Red Bull moms take care of business

Breastfeeding JOINT BASE LEWIS MCCHORD, Washington - Being a mom is a big responsibility. Being a National Guard Soldier on top of that can be even more difficult. But, thanks to a new Army policy, new moms can still provide for their babies while away for training.

For two new moms from the 34th Red Bull Infantry Division headquarters, their two-week annual training period couldn't come at a more difficult time. They were nursing mothers and the Soldiers based out of Rosemount, Minnesota, were scheduled to attend the Yama Sakura command post exercise at Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington, beginning in early December, halfway across the country. So the new moms packed up their breast pumps and set out to take care of business.

Sgt. Kristen Jones is an information technology sergeant and mom to a six-month-old son named Brentley. She was nervous when she found out she was going to have to leave for annual training when her son was still so little. She wasn't sure whether she would have to quit breastfeeding or if she would receive the support she needed in order to pump while away.

"As soon as I had the baby and came back to drill, I knew immediately that I was going to have support," said the Sioux Falls, South Dakota, native. "Everyone in my section was so supportive. I'm in a section with a bunch of guys. I know some of them may feel a little awkward, but they still helped to find a place for me and make sure I had time to pump."

"I decided to breastfeed because it's cheaper than formula and it was convenient," said Jones. "After I started breastfeeding, I really began to bond with my baby and couldn't compare it to anything else. I'm glad I could keep up with it while we were here."

When asked what advice she would share with other new moms, Jones said to make sure to know the policy. She also said that Soldiers need to be open with leadership and not to be afraid to ask for help.

To help support new moms, the Army released a new policy effective September 2015. According to the Army's breastfeeding and lactation support policy, Soldiers who choose to breastfeed will have full support from their command to express milk during the duty day.

One of the requirements of this new policy includes designating a private space with the following criteria: It must be fully enclosed, have locking capabilities, have an electrical outlet, have access to a safe water source, and, must not be a bathroom stall.

In addition to a private space, commanders must provide time for Soldiers to express milk which can vary depending on a number of variables. Commanders and soldiers must balance lactation support with readiness, however.

Maj. Brandi DeGier, the 34th Red Bull Infantry Division protection plans officer who is also breastfeeding, said the key for successful implementation of this policy is educating leaders on why it's important. When she was a company commander, she led Soldiers who chose to breastfeed and said she always worked to get them the time and space needed. It was important to her to remain flexible for her Soldiers, to treat them fairly and recommends other commanders do the same.

Commanders who have questions about the new policy can review the policy here. DeGier said they should also research the topic in order to fully understand the needs of new mothers. One good source is the American Academy of Pediatrics that recommends mothers breastfeed for at least a year, exclusively for the first six months.

"I don't believe this policy is going to affect readiness," said DeGier, mother of 6-month-old Garrett and four-year-old Jeremy, Jr. "If anything, supporting this new policy willfully will actually increase readiness. Soldiers who feel like they are being taken care of are more likely to stay in the military."

If a commander sees this new policy as a hindrance to training, he or she is going to be perceived negatively, the Albany, Minnesota, native explained. Soldiers who feel like they have support are more likely to enjoy their time in the Guard and stay in longer.

"We are fortunate to have such supportive leaders," she said. "I've been very happy with the amount of support we've received, and I don't think the implementation of this policy is going to be an issue in the Minnesota National Guard."

December 11, 2015
by Master Sgt. Ashlee J. L. Sherrill
34th Infantry Division Public Affairs



Download best photos

Download all photos




Articles archive

In The News archive

Media Advisory archive

Latest News

Minnesota aviators participate in Talisman Saber 17, lay foundation for Warfighter Training Exercise

Posted: 2017-07-25  12:55 PM
Talisman Saber CAMP ATTERBURY, Ind. - More than 140 Soldiers of the Minnesota National Guard's 34th Combat Aviation Brigade recently wrapped up participation here in the seventh iteration of the biennial training exercise Talisman Saber.

The St. Paul, Minnesota-based Soldiers were among 33,000 U.S. and Australian military personnel who convened in multiple locations around the world to support and engage in the event made up of field training and command post exercise components.

Unit members of the 34th CAB, which is adept at providing a wide spectrum of aviation support, took part in the command post exercise and used the training as an opportunity to focus on air-ground integration -- or synchronizing aviation operations into the scheme of maneuver planned and conducted by forces on the ground.



National Guard Soldiers advance to all-Army Best Warrior Competition

Posted: 2017-07-22  11:02 AM
ARNG BWC CAMP RIPLEY, Minn. - Fourteen of the Army National Guard's most elite Soldiers gathered on Camp Ripley Training Center in central Minnesota July 17-20 to determine who would compete in the all-Army Best Warrior Competition later this year.

Although every Soldier gave it their all, only one noncommissioned officer and one enlisted Soldier would claim the title of Army National Guard Best Warrior. The room was tense as everyone awaited the results during the final awards ceremony.

"We told you we were going to do everything but break you," said Command Sgt. Maj. Doug Wortham, the Minnesota National Guard Senior Enlisted Advisor. He summarized the four days explaining how the competitors all came from their respective states as individual competitors and through the competition ended up as comrades. "You were stressed, you were challenged. You guys did a fantastic job... But, the devil's in the details."



Fourteen Soldiers. Twelve States. One Competition.

Posted: 2017-07-16  09:45 PM
ARNG BWC One Soldier (junior enlisted) and one NCO (non-commissioned officer) will emerge at the top at the Army National Guard's Best Warrior Competition held at Camp Ripley, Minn., July 17-20, 2017, and move on to represent the Guard in the All-Army Best Warrior Competition in October.

The competitors have been conducting last-minute training since July 12 at Camp Ripley by honing their skills on various weapons, maintaining their physical strength and endurance, and reviewing military tasks.

"I'm feeling very confident," said Cpl. Joseph Garback, a cannon crewmember with B Co., 1st Battalion, 114th Infantry, 50th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, New Jersey National Guard. He's been preparing with the other Region 1 competition winner, Sgt. Zachary Scuncio. Garback says he has really liked the hands-on preparation at Camp Ripley and believes he's had an ample amount of time to prepare.



Minnesota-based Combat Aviation Unit Soars into Battle Phase of Bilateral Training Exercise

Posted: 2017-07-16  09:52 AM
34th CAB CAMP ATTERBURY, Indiana - More than 140 Soldiers of the Minnesota National Guard's 34th Combat Aviation Brigade have established a presence at Camp Atterbury, Indiana, where they are supporting and engaging in high-level military operations and synchronization training.

Members of the St. Paul, Minnesota-based aviation unit, which is adept at providing a wide spectrum of aviation support, recently dove into the battle phase of the bilateral training exercise Talisman Saber 17. Throughout the exercise, much of their training will focus on air-ground integration -- or synchronizing aviation operations into the scheme of maneuver planned and conducted by forces on the ground.



Article archive
 
top