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Minnesota National Guard
Moorhead man who lost sight in Iraq War to take part in Walk for Vision

MOORHEAD - Eric Marts made it a point to take care of the soldiers he led in battle in Iraq, even as repeated roadside blasts were robbing him of his eyesight

By: Helmut Schmidt, Forum Communications Co, DL-Online
Published April 27, 2012, 06:19 AM

Now blind, the 50-year-old former Army National Guard master sergeant is still helping others, hoping to give people in the same situation - whether veterans or lifelong civilians - the same advantages

Marts plans to walk with his guide dog, "Corporal" Deacon, at North Dakota State University on Saturday in the Fargo version of "Walk for Vision," the main fundraiser for the North Dakota Association of the Blind

dog

"I'm pretty blessed," Marts says matter-of-factly

After all, the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs helped get him the training and the technology to make a life without sight more navigable, as well as his big, friendly English Labrador guide dog

He wants to be part of the walk to raise money so that those without his support system can go to camps and get the same sort of help to ease their way through the world

"So I guess that's a good cause," Marts said

About half the money raised from the 14th annual "Walk for Vision" funds weeklong camp experiences at Camp Grassick near Dawson, ND, while the other half goes to other programs to help the blind, said Allan Peterson, a co-chairman of the event

Peterson hopes free-will donations bring in at least $6,000 He said Thrivent for Lutherans has also promised up to $1,200 in matching funds

Gene Taylor, athletic director for NDSU, has been connected with the event for several years

"We've been really trying to grow the numbers (at the walk) and raise awareness wherever we can," Taylor said "Those of us with sight never truly understand the challenges they (the blind) face"

Too many explosions

Marts lost his sight after many concussions suffered in a series of explosions in combat, he said

He served with the Minnesota National Guard in B Company of the 2nd Combined Arms Battalion, 136th Infantry, part of the 34th Infantry Division They were in Iraq from October 2005 to July 2007, in and around the hotspot of Fallujah

As he puts it, he's been "blown up" twice, as vehicles he's ridden in were disabled by improvised explosive devices

He's also been within 60 feet of exploding mortar rounds or rocket-propelled grenades on at least eight other occasions

The intense shockwaves from those blasts had a cumulative effect, jolting his brain far too often

In 2006, a blast went off under a vehicle in which he was riding He then lost vision in his right eye, but convinced superiors that because he shot his rifle left-handed, he could still be effective

He put a patch on his right eye and was able to talk his way back on duty

The next major blast rolled his Bradley fighting vehicle, a light tank and troop carrier Then he started losing his remaining vision quickly

"I was going blind fast," Marts said He was sent home in July 2007

In coming months, he had surgeries for shoulder and neck injuries suffered in the Bradley blast He had to give up his car keys

"That was a hard day," Marts said

That fall, he still had 10 percent vision in one eye - essentially seeing shades of gray But while training at the Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, a Chicago-area facility that has a specialty center for the blind, the rest of his sight slipped away

Deacon came into his life while he was getting his medical discharge at Fort Knox, Ky, he said An advocate from the Wounded Warrior Project asked him why he didn't have a dog

He said it was because they were too expensive

She told him not to worry about that

That was on a Friday

On Monday, he got a call from Freedom Guide Dogs for the Blind

Two years ago, a trainer flew to Fargo-Moorhead and introduced Marts to Deacon, training him on how to handle the 2-year-old pooch

"I had to learn how to speak Labrador," Marts quipped

"I gave him the rank of corporal, since that's the first leadership position" for non-commissioned officers, he said "He's definitely in a leadership position He leads me all around"

At the Hines center, Marts learned to use "all sorts of gadgets to make our lives easier" Things like a money reader, a menu and document reader, bar code scanners with voice playbacks describing what is in cans and packages and computer programs that help the blind surf the web

"There's a lot of technology out there, but people can't afford it," Marts said "I was hoping that if we can bring enough awareness, if they can raise enough money, maybe they can get some of these gadgets for these people"

Marts and his wife, Bobbie, will start the walk and make a couple of laps before they head off to his job

Marts has a radio gig with WDAY 970 AM Every Saturday at 10 am, he hosts the hourlong "Heroes of the Heartland" program, with news and information for military veterans

"I still want to be connected with what I did," Marts said "Who else can I take care of?"

He ponders whether the radio work couldn't become another career

"I'm not a bitter person You just drive on You adapt You overcome," Marts said

At the same time ...

"I would not wish anybody to lose their eyesight It's such a precious thing," he said

He's had one grandchild and another is coming in June

"I've never seen their faces I miss those visions so much," Marts said

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Readers can reach Forum reporter Helmut Schmidt at (701) 241-5583
Article source
http://www.dl-online.com/event/article/id/67249/group/homepage/



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