History
Minnesota National Guard
The Pink Tank Project
The Minnesota National Guard Pink Tank Project

Like a tank we are strong, but not invincible

The Pink Tank Project was developed to raise breast cancer awareness among Minnesota National Guard Soldiers and Airmen and the general public.

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. The Pink Tank Project demonstrates that our Soldiers and Airmen are equally as likely to be identified with breast cancer as the general public.

By becoming a member of the Pink Tank Project, you are making a promise to yourself to conduct monthly breast self exams and mammograms as directed by your health care provider. By liking our page, you will receive monthly reminders to conduct your breast self exam. Help us raise awareness by liking us on facebook at www.facebook.com/pinktankproject and sharing the page with your friends!

Starting October 1, we will be adding additional content to this page including videos featuring some of our Minnesota National Guard members who have been affected by breast cancer.

Pink Tank Project
Follow the Pink Tank Project on facebook Pink Ribbon
Minnesota National Guard Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign

Feature videos







Articles

Minnesota National Guard launches third video for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Oct. 15, 2013

Minnesota National Guard launches second video for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Oct. 8, 2013

We are strong, but not invincible
Oct. 1, 2013

Minnesota National Guard launches Pink Tank Project
Sep. 27, 2013

National Guard launches Pink Tank Project (video)
Sep. 10, 2013

October 18 is National Mammography Day

Pink TankPink Tank
Breast Self Exam

According to the Mayo Clinic, a breast exam is a self-inspection of your breasts. During a breast exam, you use your eyes and hands to observe the appearance and feel of your breasts.

Finding a breast lump when it's small increases the chance for a cure, if the lump is determined to be cancer. A smaller cancer may mean you have better surgical and other treatment options, compared with a cancer that is larger.

A study of women undergoing breast cancer surgery found that despite having had frequent screening mammograms, about 40 percent of breast cancers were discovered as the result of lumps or suspicious changes found during breast exams by the women themselves.

Begin with a visual examination of your breasts Sit or stand shirtless and braless in front of a mirror with your arms at your sides. To inspect your breasts visually, do the following:

Face forward and look for puckering, dimpling, or changes in size, shape or symmetry.
Check to see if your nipples are turned in (inverted).
Inspect your breasts with your hands pressed down on your hips.
Inspect your breasts with your arms raised overhead and the palms of your hands pressed together.
Lift your breasts to see if ridges along the bottom are symmetrical.

Next, use your hands to examine your breasts Common ways to perform the manual part of the breast exam include:

Lying down. Choose a bed or other flat surface to lie down on your back. When lying down, breast tissue spreads out, making it thinner and easier to feel.
In the shower. Lather your fingers and breasts with soap to help your fingers glide more smoothly over your skin.

Learn more at: http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-self-exam

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/womens-health/MY00379
Breast Cancer ResourcesPink Ribbon

National Breast Cancer Foundation

National Breast Cancer Coalition

Susan G. Komen

For more information contact:

Maj. Kristen Augé
Deputy Director of Public Affairs
651-268-8961
kristen.l.auge.mil@mail.mil


 
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